Why This Should Be The Year You Pay Off Back Taxes

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According to the IRS, more than 13.2 million Americans owe back taxes. The majority of these cases involve amounts that seem impossible to pay off.

That leaves those tax-owing Americans in a difficult position. They want to pay, but they can’t, and the end result is feeling a lot of guilt about the situation. There is no easy way to get out of paying your back taxes. Uncle Sam wants his money, and he’ll get it somehow.

There are steps you can take to find a solution and make 2020 the year you finally deal with your taxes.

Note, we always recommend getting in touch with a specialized Tax Resolution Professional to negotiate with the IRS on your behalf. If you’d like to schedule a no-cost confidential tax relief consultation, contact us here. Contact Us Today.

Why Now Is the Right Time to Deal with Back Taxes

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When DIY Won’t Do:

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3 Times, When Hiring a Tax Relief Professional is the Only Way to Go

When it comes to your money, there’s only one person that truly has your best interests at heart – and that person is looking back at you in the mirror. Handling your own finances and making your own decisions can give you peace of mind and help you avoid a costly mistake.

There is a lot to be said for the do-it-yourself approach to your money, yet the go it alone path does have its limitations, especially when it comes to the IRS and back taxes.

We see clients that have tried to handle their taxes on their own, sometimes raising red flags with the IRS, resulting in audits, or getting hit with a big tax bill they can’t pay. They might setup an installment agreement on their own, but oftentimes, the DIY approach just makes the penalties and interest keep stacking up putting in an endless loop of back taxes. Many of our clients started out by trying to do this on their own or with their current tax preparer.

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What is Currently Not Collectible Status from The IRS?

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Big companies are known for getting all sorts of breaks, but when average people fall behind, they rarely receive help. When you owe back taxes, but can’t afford to pay them, then you may qualify for a special tax status known as currently not collectible.

If you’re approved for currently not collectible status, then the IRS must not only cease its collection efforts but can no longer garnish your wages or seize your property.

Want to know if you qualify for currently not collectible status? Contact our firm for a specific evaluation of your situation.

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4 Mistakes That You Don’t Want to Make When Filing Your Taxes.

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(They Could Land You In Tax Trouble)

It can be a stressful experience preparing your taxes and filing them. It can be even more stressful however if you make these mistakes that land you into tax trouble. It’s important to remember that if you make mistakes that are serious enough, you might end up triggering an audit of your tax return or owe more in back taxes.

It’s early to be talking about tax season, but if you’re planning on filing your own taxes this year, here are four mistakes that you should avoid.

Don’t neglect to report all your income

Whatever your sources of income may be, whether it’s your regular paycheck, a side gig, gains that you’ve made on the stock market, or interest that you’ve earned from deposits in the bank, it’s important to remember that you should account for all of it in your tax return. If you don’t, the IRS may come looking for it.

Every time you make at least $600 in income working as an employee of any description, you get a 1099 form stating what you’ve made. The IRS gets a copy of the form, as well. This means that it makes no sense to try to hide your income from the IRS.

When you make any kind of income, you should report it on your tax return. Technically, you should even record smaller chunks of income, the kind for which you don’t get 1099 forms.

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Why Early Adopters of Cryptocurrency Should Explore Their Tax Resolution Options Now

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The stunning rise in the value of Bitcoin, along with the myriad of cryptocurrencies, is surely one of the biggest financial stories of the 21st century, at least so far. What started out as a mere curiosity and niche project for programmers and geeks has quickly blossomed into a full-fledged financial asset, and an increasingly popular one at that.

For early adopters, the financial returns have been simply mind boggling. You may have heard about the generation of Bitcoin millionaires, and there are plenty of those newly rich investors to go around.

Given the rapid rise and relative anonymity of Bitcoin transactions, it was only a matter of time before the IRS caught on, and the tax agency has caught on – and caught up – in a big way. After years of taking a hands-off approach to cryptocurrency investments, the IRS is now paying close attention – and requesting the real world identities of those supposedly anonymous buyers and sellers.

While every investor in cryptocurrency should be aware of their potential tax liability, the problem could be even more acute for early adopters – the very investors who have profited the most from this unique form of digital payment.

As with all things tax, the Internal Revenue Service is likely to start where the big money is, and the tax agency has increasingly set their sites on early adopters. If you were prescient enough to buy into the promise of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies when everyone else was looking the other way, it may be time to settle up with the IRS.

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